Book review: How Structures Work: Design and Behaviour from Bridges to Buildings (2nd ed.)

Author: T. Ji

Date published

1st August 2016

First published: 1st August 2016

Price
Free
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Book review: How Structures Work: Design and Behaviour from Bridges to Buildings (2nd ed.)

The Structural Engineer
Book review: How Structures Work: Design and Behaviour from Bridges to Buildings (2nd ed.)
Date published

1st August 2016

First published

1st August 2016

Author

T. Ji

Price

Free

Access Resource

Tianjian Ji finds this introduction to building structures to be aimed primarily at architectural students, although it will also make suitable supplementary reading for first-year civil and structural engineering students.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
1
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 8

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