Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 61): Unexploded ordnance

Author: The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Date published

3 April 2017

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Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 61): Unexploded ordnance

The Structural Engineer
Managing Health & Safety Risks (No. 61): Unexploded ordnance
Date published

3 April 2017

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Online purchases unavailable

Unfortunately we are unable to process online purchases at this time.

Find out more

Author

The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel

Unexploded ordnance (UXO) is explosive weaponry (bombs, shells, grenades, land mines, naval mines, cluster munitions, etc.) that did not explode when it was employed and still poses a risk of detonation, sometimes many decades after it was used or discarded. Such items are unearthed fairly regularly on building sites both in the UK and worldwide.

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Pages:
1
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Managing Health & Safety Risks Issue 4

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