The Structural Engineer > Archive > Volume 95 (2017) > Issue 6 > Managing Health & Safety Risks No. 63: A combined design and maintenance approach
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Managing Health & Safety Risks No. 63: A combined design and maintenance approach

Buildings and structures come in a wide variety of forms, but all will demand inspection and maintenance throughout their life. Modern buildings contain a large amount of plant: air conditioning, heating systems, lighting, lifts, etc. and all these need maintenance with occasional replacement. Window cleaning is another activity requiring access; on tall buildings, facade gantry provision will be needed. Industrial plant containing cranes will require access provisions; in some plants, the sole purpose of cranes is for them to facilitate through-life maintenance of other plant.

All structural fabrics degrade and their design lives are usually qualified via expressions such as ‘life to first maintenance’. Anticipating this, heavily exposed structures, such as bridges over water, may be provided with purpose-built access gantries from the outset of operation.

Author(s): The Institution of Structural Engineers' Health and Safety Panel