The Ned

Structural Designer

Elliott Wood Partnership

Client Name

Poultry Tenant Ltd- A Soho House & Co and Sydell Group partnership

Location

London, UK

PRINCIPAL CONTRACTOR: Ardmore Construction           

ARCHITECT: EPR Architects Ltd     

KEY TEAM MEMBER: Gardiner & Theobald           

HISTORIC BUILDING CONSULTANT Turley Associates

PROJECT MANAGER: Gardiner & Theobald

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The Midland Bank building is Grade I listed, originally designed by Lutyens and is located in the heart of the City of London, on Poultry. The building was constructed in the 1920s and is an example of an early steel frame clad with brick and ashlar stone façades. The building was acquired by new owners in 2012 with the intention of transforming it into the central London space for Soho House. Soho House has a worldwide reputation for the quality of their hotel and leisure facilities. Many of their current spaces are located within landmark historic properties and their sensitive reuse is a signature of the brand.

Judge's comment:

The Midland Bank building in the City of London consists of a steel frame clad with brick and stone façades. The project brief required the transformation of the original headquarters buildings into a modern five star hotel. This involved considerable and complex structural engineering design in order to incorporate numerous additions and modifications to the existing fabric, including a two-storey roof extension with a pool and bars, a new full height circulation core, alterations to the structure of the two stone domes, and numerous interventions for plumbing and services.

The engineering design enabled considerable extra load to be carried on the existing vertical structure by redistribution of loading patterns, thereby avoiding intervention on columns clad in marble and whose alteration was forbidden. This approach also reduced overall strengthening requirements, thereby improving the sustainability credentials of the project. The domes had to be jacked up to allow adequate headroom for the new bars, requiring considerable ingenuity to avoid damaging listed ceilings and stonework. Further complications were overcome in the basement areas, where future underground tube lines required ingenious solutions to foundation construction problems.