Presidential Address. Formation of the Principal Engineering Institutions Continued

Author: Etchells, E Fiander

Date published

1 September 1923

First published: 1 September 1923

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Added to basket

Back to Previous

Presidential Address. Formation of the Principal Engineering Institutions Continued

The Structural Engineer
Presidential Address. Formation of the Principal Engineering Institutions Continued
Date published

1 September 1923

First published

1 September 1923

Author

Etchells, E Fiander

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

PART VI. Continued. As early as 1902 the present writer had realised that there was a scope for an Institution of Structural Engineers, which, under the aegis of the Institution of Civil Engineers, would do for specialised structural work, what the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and the Institution of Electrical Engineers had done in their respective spheres. E. Fiander Etchells

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Volume 1 (1923) Issue 9

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
The British Standard Specification for Portland Cement Again Needs Revision. - Othe National Standar

The British Standard Specification for Portland Cement Again Needs Revision. - Othe National Standar

The British Standard Specification for Portland cement was first issued in 1904 by the Engineering Standards Committee (now the British Engineering Standards Association, incorporated in 1918), a body, as its name implies, entrusted with the framing of engineering standards of all kinds, and supported by all the chief Engineering Institutions of this country. This specification was drawn up by a representative committee, 25 in number, consisting of engineers, contractors and cement manufacturers, etc., under the chairmanship of the late Sir William Mathews, the well-known dock and harbour engineer. D.B. Butler

Date - 1 September 1923
Author - Butler, D B
Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
British Standard Specification. Consistency of Mortar

British Standard Specification. Consistency of Mortar

Let C = the number of parts by weight of Dry Portland Cement. S = the number of parts by weight of dry sand. C = the percentage of water by weight required by the Portland cement. S = the percentage of water by weight required to damp the sand. W = the percentage of water by weight required by the combined weights of Portland cement and sand.

Date - 1 September 1923
Author - Lloyd, H G
Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
Western Counties Branch Report of the First Meeting

Western Counties Branch Report of the First Meeting

The first meeting, since its inauguration, of the newly formed Western Counties branch of the Institution of Structural Engineers was held on Saturday afternoon, 24th February, 1923, at Bristol University. This was preceded by a visit of inspection to the new buildings of the University in course of erection. The members and a number of friends, making a party of about 50, assembled at the top of Park Street, and by the kind permission of the architects, Messrs. Oatley and Lawrence, were conducted over the new buildings, and were able to see the progress that has been made, and were furnished with a number of particulars that might also be of interest to the members generally. The new buildings lie to the south of the earlier buildings of the University, and are grouped around a Quadrangle at the back, and a forecourt in the front towards Queen’s Road. The most prominent feature from the street is the tower, which has at present reached rather over a third of its ultimate height. The main entrance is in the base of the tower, and leads immediately into the entrance hall (75 ft. high to the fan vaulting) from which rise two parallel flights of stairs of easy ascent leading directly to the great hall, approached through a wide vestibule or crush space at the top of the stairs. This vestibule is to be vaulted in stone upon the same principle as the entrance hall. The body of the great hall measures 100 ft. by 50 ft. It is covered by a hammer beam roof of English oak, now in course of construction, and is provided with a recessed orchestra at its northern end and two superimposed recessed galleries at the opposite extremity.

Date - 1 March 1923
Price - £9