The Effect of Existing Regulations on Pillar Design in Steel-framed Buildings

Author: Drury, F E

Date published

1st January 1933

First published: 1st January 1933

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Added to basket

Back to Previous

The Effect of Existing Regulations on Pillar Design in Steel-framed Buildings

The Structural Engineer
The Effect of Existing Regulations on Pillar Design in Steel-framed Buildings
Date published

1st January 1933

First published

1st January 1933

Author

Drury, F E

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The designers and manufacturers of steelwork for buildings have expressed continuously, for several years, their view that it is possible to economise to a considerable extent, and with safety, if building regulations would permit. This urge for economy has not arisen suddenly,and has no relation to an economic crisis; the urge arises from a realisation that steel can be utilised to better advantage, particularly in pillars, because greater stresses are justifiable than are at present permitted. The experience of other countries and their development of the more economical and advantageous employment of steel has been noted by British engineers. They have shown that, given less restrictions, they are capable of competing for overseas trade, but they are just as eager to utilise their steel in the most economical way in the home market. It is unquestionably the opinion of a large body of structural engineers that existing regulations are in many respects of a very conservative character and will bear rather drastic revision under several heads. F E Drury

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 1

Related Resources & Events

The Structural Engineer
Corrigenda

Corrigenda

We very much regret that the following printers' errors occurred in the December issue of The Structural Engineer :- Page 398- "Stewart & Partridges,Limited" should read "Stewart & Partners, Limited" Page 404- The figure "330 O.D." should read "300 O.D." Page 409-"Chief Surveyor" should read "Chief Quantity Surveyor" Page 42-"Breaking of cracks" should read "Breathing of Cracks".

Date - 1st January 1933
Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
Correspondence

Correspondence

To the Editor of The Structural Engineer. Water-Cement Ratio. Sir,-In reference to Mr. C S Gray’s letter,Professor Duff A Abrams states that "Aggregates of equivalent concrete making qualities may be produced by an indefinite number of different gradings of a given material." "Aggregates of equivalent concrete qualities may be produced from materials of widely different size and grading." "In general, fine and coarse aggregates of widely different size or grading can be combined in such a manner as to produce similar results in concrete." The meaning seems to point clearly to the fact that size or grading may vary widely in each aggregate, but not the different aggregates unless they have equivalent concrete qualities. W D Williams

Date - 1st January 1933
Price - £9
The Structural Engineer
Creep Properties of Metals

Creep Properties of Metals

Perhaps the most characteristic property of metals at high temperatures is their ability to flow or creep when under prolonged load, and it is because of that property that the stress necessary to cause fracture of a metal at high temperatures depends on its time of application. Table I illustrates the marked falling away in the stress required to cause fracture, the longer the stress is applied. In the case of nickel-chromium steel at 600°C and brass at 250ºC stresses less than one fortieth of the breaking strengths determined from ordinary tensile tests at 600°C and 250ºC respectively, cause creep of the order of 10-5 inch per inch per day. If, at the stresses given in the last column of Table I, the creep were continuous at 10-5 inch per inch per day a deformation of 1 inch in 100 inches would be produced in 1,000 days, or roughly three years. In many instances, therefore, even such low stresses as those cited are too high for working stresses. H J Tapsell

Date - 1st January 1933
Author - Tapsell, H J
Price - £9