Interim Report on Bearing Pressures on Brickwork . Report of the Masonry Sectional Committee on the
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Interim Report on Bearing Pressures on Brickwork . Report of the Masonry Sectional Committee on the

The Structural Engineer
Interim Report on Bearing Pressures on Brickwork . Report of the Masonry Sectional Committee on the
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Detailed drawings of the test panels of brickwork, together with the numerical results
obtained in testing them, appeared in pages 379 to 384 of the Journal last month. These
are here followed by photographs showing the appearance of the cracks in the panels, from the front and from behind, after failure; the photographs are arranged in the same order as the drawings to admit of easy cross-reference,and in each case the Blue bricks are distinguished from the Flettons by a letter B. It is to be noted that in each case the bearing of the joist was uniform over the thickness of the panel, so that the cracks are ino way the effect of edge pressure.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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