Discussion. A New High Tensile Steel for Structural Work
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Discussion. A New High Tensile Steel for Structural Work

The Structural Engineer
Discussion. A New High Tensile Steel for Structural Work
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The CHAIRMAN (Mr. Ewart S . Andrews, BSc., M.Inst.C.E., Vice-president) proposed a very hearty vote of thanks to Mr. Roberts for the excellent material he had provided for study, and for the excellent manner in which he had described the properties of the high tensile steel dealt with.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Opinion Issue 7

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