The Layout, Design and Construction of Aerodromes and Airports

Author: Brooke-Bradley, H E

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The Layout, Design and Construction of Aerodromes and Airports

The Structural Engineer
The Layout, Design and Construction of Aerodromes and Airports
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Brooke-Bradley, H E

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The rapid growth of aerial transportation during the last ten years so admirably illustrated by the activities of Imperial Airways Ltd., and particularly the wide interest shown in the spectacular flight of Scott and Black from Mildenhall Aerodrome to Melbourne in two and a half days, have focussed public attention on the urgent necessity for providing adequate landing fields and aerodromes in this country. It is noteworthy that H.R.H. The Prince of Wales remarked at the recent Airport Conference, “Take care of the wheels and the wings will take care of themselves.” The aeronautical engineer has indeed done his share, and such enormous strides have been made in aircraft design that the operational speed of machines is approaching 200 m.p.h. If, therefore, it is true that “time is money,” here is economy with a vengeance. H.E. Brooke-Bradley

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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