Dock Gates

Author: Easton, F M

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The Structural Engineer
Dock Gates
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Easton, F M

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

AT ports subject to tidal fluctuations the water is usually impounded at a level approaching that of high water of spring tides and often at a considerably higher level. The entrance locks are generally provided with two or three pairs of double leaf gates, rotating on vertical a,xes at the sides of the lock. This paper deals with the design and construction of such gates according to modern British practice, for waterways between 50 ft. and 130 ft. in widt,h and in depth from 25 ft. to 55 ft. F.M. Easton

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 11

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