The Strength of Steel Frame Buildings

Author: Andrews, Ewart S

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The Strength of Steel Frame Buildings

The Structural Engineer
The Strength of Steel Frame Buildings
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Andrews, Ewart S

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

IN the design of steel frame buildings it is usual to adopt a “factor of safety” of four, and many people think that this means that four times the ordinary load upon the building would cause failure. This is, however, by no means the case, and it is very difficult to say how many times the ordinary load upon the building would cause failure. Fortunately failures in practice are extremely rare-the author does not remember seeing particulars of a single failure during the past twenty years-and we therefore are unable to learn much as to the actual strength of steel frame buildings from an analysis of the loads and stresses in a building that has failed. Ewart S. Andrews

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 12

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