Concrete in California. Ocean Beach Esplanade, San Francisco
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Concrete in California. Ocean Beach Esplanade, San Francisco

The Structural Engineer
Concrete in California. Ocean Beach Esplanade, San Francisco
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The following is an extract from a paper on “Ocean Beach Esplanade, San Francisco, California,” by M. M. O’Shaughnessy, M.Am.Soc.C.E., which appeared in the Proceedings of the Am.Soc.C.E., for November 1923, page 1846.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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