The Strength of Concrete; Its Relation to the Cement, Aggregates and Water. - Part III
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The Strength of Concrete; Its Relation to the Cement, Aggregates and Water. - Part III

The Structural Engineer
The Strength of Concrete; Its Relation to the Cement, Aggregates and Water. - Part III
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

IV. Mortar Voids and Water Content, The magnitude of the voids and its change with additions of water will depend upon the gradation of the particles of F.A., each A. having its own individuality. J. Singleton-Green

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 4

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