New Bridge, Sydney Harbour
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New Bridge, Sydney Harbour

The Structural Engineer
New Bridge, Sydney Harbour
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

AS we have previously announced the Government of New South Wales has accepted the tender of Messrs. Dorman, Long & Co., Ltd., of Middlesbrough for the construction of the North Shore Bridge over Sydney Harbour. We have now the pleasure to present the accompanying illustration showing the bridge ,as it will appear when completed.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Feature Issue 5

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