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Correspondence

The Structural Engineer
Correspondence
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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Two Structural Failures Sir,-Recently two structural failures occurred, which have been considered of sufficient public interest to be described in the Literary Digest, a periodical that collates Press opinion and gives excerpts of matters of unusual interest. One of these was the Gleno dam failure in Italy. The other was the total collapse of a 200-room hotel building, seven stories of which had been constructed. The latter structure was a reinforced concrete building in Benton Harbour, Michigan, U.S.A.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Opinion Issue 6

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