Structural Defence

Author: Swindlehurst, J E

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Structural Defence

The Structural Engineer
Structural Defence
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Swindlehurst, J E

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

WHEN the subject of this Paper was first chosen it was the intention to present in some detail some aspects of the problems of defence that had engaged the attention of the Structural Engineer between the years 1939 to 1945. J.E. Swindlehurst

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 7

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