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The Structural Engineer

An Ordinary General Meeting of the Institution was held at 11, Upper Belgrave Street, London, S.W.1, on Friday, February 24th, 1950, at 5.55 p.m., Mr. Leslie Turner, B.Sc. , M.I.C.E., M.I.Struct.E. (President), in the Chair.

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The Structural Engineer

In the ordinary multi-storey building frame wind loads are transmitted to the columns by beams at floor levels so that interpanel loading is usually absent or at least negligible compared with the total wind shear across the storey and in such cases the treatment already given is sufficient. But industrial and factory buildings may consist of only a few storeys of considerable height, depending on the purpose of the building, and in such cases wind loads are transmitted to the columns by intermediate beams or wind girders and the effects of this interpanel loading cannot then be neglected. Interpanel loading is usually treated in two stages the moments due to such loading being first distributed throughout the frame with all joints propped against side sway, the values of the props being deduced from the resulting end moments. The props are then removed, the frame being allowed to sway. It is only this final step, as applied to symmetrical single bay frames with which we have so far been concerned.

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The Structural Engineer

The object of the following Paper is to present a simple and short method of treating the side sway effects due to lateral forces acting on symmetrical building frames. N. Naylor

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Author – Naylor, N

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The Structural Engineer

This paper describes the design and erection of a 16-sided glazed steel tower 36 feet diameter and 140 feet high, which encloses a hot water accumulator. The tower is of welded construction and was pre-fabricated in large sections. Wind stresses were given special attention in the design. Guthlac Wilson

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Author – Wilson, Guthlac

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The Structural Engineer

The outer harbour of Dunkirk, which covers an area of 80 hectares (about 180 acres), is bounded on the west by a block jetty on rock, on the east by a framework jetty of reinforced concrete on caissons sunk by compressed air (which forms an extension to the old east jetty of the harbour), and on the south by the new earth platforms. The outer harbour is connected with the main harbour by the old channel on one side and by the new lock, known as the "Watier Lock," on the other. The lock gives access to the new basin which forms an extension of the harbour of Dunkirk on the west. Next to Ijmuiden and Emden, it is one of the largest locks in Europe (Figs. I and 2). M. Le Gorgeu

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Author – Le Gorgeu, M

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