An Investigation of the Strength of Welded Portal Frame Connections and An Investigation of the Stre
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An Investigation of the Strength of Welded Portal Frame Connections and An Investigation of the Stre

The Structural Engineer
An Investigation of the Strength of Welded Portal Frame Connections and An Investigation of the Stre
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

THE CHAIRMAN (Mr. Walter C. Andrews, O.B.E., M.I.C.E., Vice-president), introducing Dr. Hendry, referred to his earlier paper on “An Investigation of the Stress Distribution in Steel Portal Frame Knees,” in 1947, for which he was awarded the Sessional Medal and Research Prize From that and his other contributions, listed in the papers now before the meeting, it seemed that Dr. Hendry had made a “corner” in portal frame knees and allied matters.

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Issue 9

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