Some Critical Remarks on the New Edition of the British Standard Specification for Portland Cement

Author: Mathiesen, Julius

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Some Critical Remarks on the New Edition of the British Standard Specification for Portland Cement

The Structural Engineer
Some Critical Remarks on the New Edition of the British Standard Specification for Portland Cement
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Mathiesen, Julius

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

A new and revised edition of the British Standard Specification for Portland Cement has recently been issued and is now for sale, having replaced the previous edition dated 1920. Julius Mathiesen

Additional information

Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

Tags

Issue 11

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