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Army Vocational Training

The Structural Engineer
Army Vocational Training
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

THE soldier of today is much better off than his comrade of pre-war days, for there now exists in the Army the means to train warrant officers, N.C.O.'S and men in building, engineering and agriculture to prepare them for civil employment on discharge from the service. Lieut. B.H.D. Hurst

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 12

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