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The Structural Engineer

Sir - I am grateful for the support which Mr. Spencer gives in his letter towards the more extensive use of the New Sections, and for adding another to the list of those already rolled given by me. Sir - May I suggest that the explanation why cement of flattened grain particles gives higher tensile (or compressive) strength is not "mechanical interlocking power;" but a greater exposed surface. The "gell" or "quick" state of the cement particles after the addition of water, will manifestly reach the centre of the flattened grain more rapidly than for a particle with less exposed surface but equal volume.

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The Structural Engineer

The making of canals is a very important branch of structural engineering. In fact, it is no exaggeration to say that the Suez and Panama canals are among the greatest engineering exploits ever performed. The subject of the present article has no such great work to his credit, but his name is of importance in the history of engineering because he was the chief pioneer of canal construction, and when one considers the limited means at his disposal, his achievement is a very remarkable one. A Trystan Edwards

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Author – Edwards, A Trystan

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The Structural Engineer

About 1857, when I was living at Poplar, the building of the Leviathun steamship, designed by the great Brunel, was going on, and I remember walking to the further end of the Isle of Dogs to see it lying on the shore after the first attempt at launching. At that time there were one or two small factories near the Folly House on the north-east corner of the island, but otherwise it was all pasture land and marsh intersected by narrow roads and ditches. The ship, afterwards known as the Great Eastern, was marvellous for its enormous size and construction. It had several paddle-wheels and screw propellers with their respective engines, but was so extravagant in fuel that I believe it made only one paying voyage, and that was in laying the Atlantic Telegraph cable. Professor Henry Adams

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Author – Adams, Henry

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The Structural Engineer

Before beginning the paper proper, perhaps a word or so will not be out of place on the pronunciation of the title, whether it is “Acoostics ” or “Acowstics.” As a matter of fact, both styles seem to be correct, one dictionary giving one form and one another. The “New Oxford” gives both. Also I understand that “Acoostics” is preferred in Scotland. We may, therefore, safely assume that it is a matter of individual choice. A G Huntley

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Author – Huntley, A G

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The Structural Engineer

Rolled steel esctions as articles of commerce, must be efficient commercially, and as materials of construction they must be efficient technically. W. Basil Scott

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Author – Scott, W Basil

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