Britain’s First Chair in Structural Engineering
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Britain’s First Chair in Structural Engineering

Britain’s First Chair in Structural Engineering
The Structural Engineer
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The Manchester College of Science and Technology was created by Royal Charter in 1955. The former Municipal College of Technology has been absorbed in the new College and the Royal Charter also preserves the existing relationship with the University of Manchester under which the Faculty of Technology was established in the College in 1905.

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 3

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