The Overseas Sections
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The Overseas Sections

The Structural Engineer
The Overseas Sections
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The Singapore and Federation of Malaya Section THE SINGAPORE and Federation of Malaya Section of the Institution of Structural Engineers was formed in 1956. This is the first Section of the Institution to come into being in the Far East although, as older members may recollect, the Institution was represented in Malaya before the last war by the Engineering Association of Malaya, whose application to become an Allied Society of the Institution of Structural Engineers was granted by the Council in 1937. The alliance did much to further the aims and objects of the Institution in Malaya and various facilities became available to members resident in that area. This arrangement continued until the occupation of the Peninsula by the Japanese forces in 1942, when all communication ceased for the duration of the war. In October 1945, the Institution received a welcome cablegram from Mr. T. A. Clark (Associate-Member) giving the news that he was “ free, fit and back at work ” and offering to provide information of other members in the area. It was learnt with regret that Mr. J. W. Russell (Associate-Member) had died in Borneo in 1944 during a forced march from Kuching to Labuan and that Mr. F. G. Coales (Member) had lost his life in escaping from Singapore by sea.

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