Some Factors in the Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams

Author: Neville, A M;Lord, E

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Some Factors in the Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams

The Structural Engineer
Some Factors in the Shear Strength of Reinforced Concrete Beams
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Neville, A M;Lord, E

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The different types of shear failure of reinforced concrete rectangular and T-beams are described in order to show that the shear strength depends on factors additional to those recognized by the design formulae. Results of experiments on the influence on shear strength of the size of the compression zone of the beam and of hooks on plain and deformed bars are presented. Tests on rectangular beams with varying amounts of compression reinforcement suggest that this does not affect the shear capacity of the beam. A. M. Neville and and E. Lord

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 7

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