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The Structural Engineer

Mr. P. A. CAMPBELL (Associate-Member) referred to the Author’s suggestion that the Institution should not exclude from membership potential designers who may have a low mathematical ceiling and to his remark that a talent for design in the sense of creative invention rather than analytical refinement is often incompatible with a talent for mathematics. The latter was very true and he thought the Author would agree that those with a talent for design and a low mathematical ceiling should follow an architectural rather than a structural engineering career.

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The Structural Engineer

Available model methods are briefly described and examples are given from published work to indicate some of the design problems which have been solved with the help of models. A more detailed description is then given of the use of models at Imperial College by the authors to study respectively erection problems in a prestressed steel bridge, the stiffnesses and stresses in the reinforced concrete services tower of a tall steel framed building, and the stresses and deformations in a concrete arch dam. S. R. Sparkes and J. C. Chapman

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The Structural Engineer

This paper describes how the accommodation in the Victoria Tower has been increased, without appreciably increasing the load on the walls and foundations by the removal of a number of floors carried on cast-iron beams and columns and their replacement by a larger number of floors of modern construction. R. W. Frost

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Author – Frost, R W

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The Structural Engineer

During the past fifty years, the broad trend in all transfer equipment has been to change from steel wheels running on steel rails or on metalled roadways to rubber tyred wheels running on roadways of almost any kind. For example, earth-moving and quarrying equipment of all types is now in the main rubber shod whilst in factory equipment such as fork lift trucks and straddle cars etc., rubber tyres have virtually ousted steel wheeled bogies. Indeed, heavy rubber tyred transfer cars for liquid metal are mooted for steelworks. The main reasons for this change-over are increased speed and manoeuvrability in operation and overall economy. E.M. Lewis

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Author – Lewis, E M

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