The Structural Engineer as Artist Chapter I. - Introductory

Author: Edwards, A Trystan

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The Structural Engineer as Artist Chapter I. - Introductory

The Structural Engineer
The Structural Engineer as Artist Chapter I. - Introductory
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Edwards, A Trystan

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

AN engineer is now able to create in his imagination and to make stable in actuality a A very great variety of structural shapes. There comes a time when people ask "Are these shapes beautiful?” and the interrogatory can be much further expanded-“If the shapes are not beautiful can they be made so?" Then supposing- that the answer to this latter question is in the affirmative, engineers will demand to know who is to be the judge whether this mysterious quality of beauty has, in fact, been achieved, and some of them may even be bold enough to inquire whether such a quality is really necessary in the majority of those structures which serve our needs in this industrial age. A. Trystan Edwards

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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