The Structural Engineer as Artist Chapter IX. - Bridges

Author: Edwards, A Trystan

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The Structural Engineer as Artist Chapter IX. - Bridges

The Structural Engineer
The Structural Engineer as Artist Chapter IX. - Bridges
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Edwards, A Trystan

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

No more responsible task can fall to a structural engineer than that of designing bridges. One reason for this is that bridge design may entail the most difficult problems of construction which engineers have to solve, while the other is that the bridge holds a very important place in architecture and people expect it to assume a dignified and imposing shape. In the series of articles entitled " Great Engineers " which appeared in the pages of this Journal last year I had occasion to refer to some of the most famous bridges of the past. The works of the two Rennies, Telford, the Brunels, Robert Stephenson, Sir John Fowler and Sir John Wolfe Barry were passed under review. Not only were famous stone bridges such as Waterloo Bridge, London Bridge, Dunkeld Bridge and the Royal Border Bridge described and analysed but examples belonging to " the steel age " of bridgebuilding, such as the Forth Bridge, the Tower Bridge, Saltash Bridge and the suspension bridges at the Menai Straits and at Clifton were the subject of detailed comment. I do not propose, therefore, to traverse this same ground again, but shall devote my attention entirely to the more modern developments of bridge-building, and especially to those which exemplify the new ferro-concrete construction. A. Trystan Edwards

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