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The Structural Engineer

The virtual work equation by which flexural deformations are related has been corrected to allow for the effect of axial compressive forces. These corrections can be applied wherever the end moments on an axially loaded member are defined and are particularly useful in the determination of the elastic critical loads of structural systems by reiterative numerical methods. L.K. Stevens

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Author – Stevens, L K

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The Structural Engineer

This paper presents an extension of the Cross method of moment distribution to the analysis of continuous frames with members having hinges located between supports. General expressions for the stiffness, carry-over factor and fixed-end moments are derived for members with variable moment of inertia. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the procedure of analysis. S.L. Lee, R.S. Harwell and F.P. Wiesinger

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Author – Lee, S L;Harwell, R S;Wiesinger, F P

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The Structural Engineer

The paper offers a solution in general terms for the design of the two major types of power station in use today. The variety of problems confronting the engineer when preparing a design for either a conventional, coal-fired or a modern, nuclear-powered station are discussed and special reference is made, under the following sub-headings, to a number of essential factors which control the design and construction of a power station. H. Dickson

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The Structural Engineer

The Chairman, opening the discussion, said that the Institution had received an interesting letter from Sir Edwin McAlpine, parts of which were pertinent to the discussion and which he would read. Sir Edwin had said that he very much regretted that owing to a previous engagement he was prevented from attending the meeting, but took the opportunity of calling attention to a few of the more unusual aspects of the very large scheme. The letter then continued: ‘ First and foremost, I think some of the problems in foundations on this site gave very good opportunities for improving our knowledge of the use of cylinder piles, for example the special treatment of the retaining wall adjacent to the Kings Scholars’ Pond Sewer. Secondly, the decision to use a dewatering system instead of steel sheet piling for the pile cap raft supporting Block A, which resulted in a saving in time and money and also eliminating the troubles of noise nuisance which are engendered by driving steel sheet piling in an area such as this.‘

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The Structural Engineer

At the meeting a number of members contributed to a discussion on Dr. Plowman's paper and their comments were recorded by the Institution's shorthand writer, Mr. A. R. Purchase, whose death was announced a day or two later. Despite many efforts it has proved impossible to transcribe Mr. Purchase's notes. The written contributions to the discussion are published below, with Dr. Plowman's replies. The Institution offers its apologies to Dr. Plowman and to those members who spoke at the meeting for the fact that publication of the full discussion is impossible.

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The Structural Engineer

This paper presents a method of determining influence lines involving the use of Mûller-Breslau's principle and the direct distribution of deformation. The method is applicable, generally, to continuous beams, symmetrical or unsymmetrical frames, and structures with prismatic or non-prismatic members. Alan Williams

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Author – Williams, Alan

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The Structural Engineer

The paper begins with a brief description of an operation on an ordinary steel-framed building which was in danger of collapse. Glass played an important role in preventing the complete collapse of this building before the remedial works were put in hand. Attention is directed to the inherent strength of glass, which is very much in evidence when glass is drawn into fine filaments. Descriptions of glass reinforced plastics and other ' two-phase ' materials follow and details of the various types of glass reinforced plastics are included. The properties of glass reinforced plastics, structural steel and aluminium alloy are tabulated for comparison. In conclusion possible future developments in the field of 'two-phase' materials are mentioned and structural engineers are reminded of the necessity to familiarize themselves with the properties of these new materials and to assist in their development for structural purposes. T. Holmshaw

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Author – Holmshaw, T

Price – £9