Structural Aspects of the Extension of a Hangar for the BOAC at London Airport

Author: Payne, N J;Shadbolt, K F

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Structural Aspects of the Extension of a Hangar for the BOAC at London Airport

The Structural Engineer
Structural Aspects of the Extension of a Hangar for the BOAC at London Airport
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Payne, N J;Shadbolt, K F

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The paper describes the structural engineering aspects of the extension of British Overseas Airways Corporation’s wing hangar at London Airport to receive the VClO aircraft. The basic factors affecting the evolution of the final scheme are given, particularly with reference to future requirements. The reasons for the choice of reinforced lightweight concrete for the roof beams are stated, and the development of the design in this medium is described. Comparison is made between the permissible stresses adopted at the time of the design and those now permitted by amendment No. 1 to CP 114 : 1957. N.J. Payne and K.F. Shadbolt

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 11

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