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The Structural Engineer

This paper explains how the Joint Committee came to be appointed, briefly describes the difficulties with which it had to contend, and outlines the steps by which it arrived at its final recommendations. F.A. Partridge

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The Structural Engineer

The paper describes large deflexions found in electrically floor heated reinforced concrete slabs in a considerable number of Scottish flats and gives the basic reasons why such deflexions occur. It goes on to describe a number of laboratory tests to ascertain the shrinkage of the aggregates used for constructing the floors and the influence on concrete made with such aggregates and similar sands. The results of E tests are given. An investigation into the temperature and deflexion characteristics with or without live load of a typical flat is described and the results are given, together with examples of deflexion readings from other flats and core crushing results. R.A. Sefton Jenkins, J.M. Plowman and B.A. Haseltine

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Author – Jenkins, R A Sefton;Plowman, J M;Haseltine, B A

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The Structural Engineer

A technique is presented of reaching the critical load of frames with redundant members in a systematic manner which reduces the amount of arithmetic needed in repeated trial and error methods. A very simple redundant truss is given as an example, but the method has been applied to more complicated frames with several redundants. Arthur Bolton

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Author – Bolton, Arthur

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The Structural Engineer

Opening the discussion, the President asked if Mr. Evans could say something further regarding costs. For example, what was the approximate cost per seat of all the seats under the canopy?

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The Structural Engineer

Mr. F. Turton (Member) said that he was interested in the history of these bridges. In the Lune Bridge they had an excellent example of a problem which the bridge engineers concerned had at some time or another met in three different ways. The designer of the original bridge had decided to use framed arches in timber; what his reasons had been they did not know but it seemed a rather elegant solution to a problem quite different from the one met on the present occasion, since the original designer had not had to deal with railway traffic. He had probably had to allow for river traffic from the harbour which then existed at Lancaster, upstream of the bridge, and for the passage of sailing vessels, or possibly steam vessels, with tall masts.

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