The Structural use of Precast Concrete and the british Standard Code of Practice CP 116 (1965). Disc
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The Structural use of Precast Concrete and the british Standard Code of Practice CP 116 (1965). Disc


The Structural Engineer
The Structural use of Precast Concrete and the british Standard Code of Practice CP 116 (1965). Disc
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

Mr. Ralph Freeman, President-Elect of the Institution of Civil Engineers: ' I am pleased to join Dr. Matthews as the formal representative this evening of the Institution of Civil Engineers. This is the first Joint Meeting of our two Institutions. I cannot imagine why there has not been one before, but it is better late than never. Everyone will agree that it is a manifestation of the trend towards the better and constantly developing interprofessional relationships which are absolutely essential in the engineering profession and the other professions with which we work to contribute to what I will call " the design of human environment ". We must always act in the interests of the nation as a whole and not solely in our own interests. This makes the meeting a vital one and it is to be hoped that there will be many more Joint Meetings in the future. '

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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