A Method of Calculating the Ultimate Strength of Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Beams in Combin
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A Method of Calculating the Ultimate Strength of Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Beams in Combin

The Structural Engineer
A Method of Calculating the Ultimate Strength of Reinforced and Prestressed Concrete Beams in Combin
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

This paper presents a simple method of calculating the failure load on a reinforced or prestressed concrete beam. The method is applicable to both flexure and shear failure zones irrespective of size and section and is based on tests, results of which are discussed at the end of the paper. The original fests for shear were carried out for Messrs. Pierhead Limited at Feltham and Liverpool on their standard units. The results of fire tests on a number of joists in Holland published in the report no. 13 by CUR are also analysed from the ultimate strength point of view and compared with the predicted failure load. J. Bobrowski and B.K. Bardhan-Roy

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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