Load Distribution in Cellular Decks with no Intermediate Diaghragms

Author: Parkhouse, J G

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Load Distribution in Cellular Decks with no Intermediate Diaghragms

The Structural Engineer
Load Distribution in Cellular Decks with no Intermediate Diaghragms
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Parkhouse, J G

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

A description is given of a system of interconnected beams representing a right simply supported multiple web cellular deck with no intermediate diaphragms, followed by an outline of a method of analysing the response of such a system to any externally applied loading. A short computer program using this method of analysis is described. Results produced by this program are compared with experimental results of a model test and show agreement to within a few per cent. Finally it is shown how this theory was applied to the design of the New Cattle Market Bridge now under construction which when completed will carry the new Derby Inner Ring Road over the River Derwent. J.G. Parkhouse

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 5

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