Halifax Building Society New Head Office

Author: Brook, W E W;Halsall, H

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Halifax Building Society New Head Office

The Structural Engineer
Halifax Building Society New Head Office
Date published

N/A

Author

Brook, W E W;Halsall, H

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now
Author

Brook, W E W;Halsall, H

The Halifax Building Society, the largest in the world, commissioned the authors' firm in January 1968 to design their new head office in the town of Halifax. The project, now completed is perhaps one of the most sophisticated office buildings yet constructed in the UK, being one of the first buildings to be equipped with a fully automated electronic filing and retrieval system. The main office accommodation is at high level, and the building is air-conditioned throughout all working areas, using a heat recovery method. The design and construction of the structural aspects of the building are described in the paper.

W.E.W. Brook and H. Halsall

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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