Discussion on the Design of the Channel Tunnel by H.B. Gould, G.O. Jackson and S.G. Tough
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Discussion on the Design of the Channel Tunnel by H.B. Gould, G.O. Jackson and S.G. Tough

The Structural Engineer
Discussion on the Design of the Channel Tunnel by H.B. Gould, G.O. Jackson and S.G. Tough
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Mr. A. M. Muir Wood (Sir William Halcrow B Partners): I think I am possibly the only one here who has been concerned with each stage of this project from its rebirth, as it were, in 1959 until the date of its suspended animation in 1975. While I have been concerned with it on and off-mostly off-nevertheless, I have seen a number of changes and constant evolution.

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Opinion Issue 12

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