Overall Stability of Structures

Author: Dowrick, David J

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Overall Stability of Structures

The Structural Engineer
Overall Stability of Structures
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Dowrick, David J

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

A definition of structuralstability is given in terms of the sensitivity of structures to variations of the design parameters. The problem of overall stability is then considered, as distinct from localmember stability, and two main modes of overall instability are identified, namely lateral and torsionalinstability. Each of these modes of overall instability are then examined in terms of some of the main factors involved, particularly the variability of live loads, stiffness and geometry, and the influence of geometrical changes during live loading and differential settlements. Statistical methods have been used where appropriate. David J. Dowrick

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 10

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