Optimum Design of Welded Plate Girders

Author: Jenkins, W M;de Jesus, G C;Burns, A

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Optimum Design of Welded Plate Girders

The Structural Engineer
Optimum Design of Welded Plate Girders
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Author

Jenkins, W M;de Jesus, G C;Burns, A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The theoretical background to the design of welded plate girders according to BS449 is adopted in a search for optimum design. Within certain practical limitations, design curves are derived for minimum weight design. A computer-based design system is described from which minimum cost designs can be produced for conventional plate girders and welded crane girders. Some observations derived from computer results are given which, together with the design curves, provide guidelines to wards obtaining an optimum design. G.C. de Jesus and A. Burns

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Format:
PDF
Publisher:
The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 12

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