Integrating New and Old Buildings
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Integrating New and Old Buildings

The Structural Engineer
Integrating New and Old Buildings
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

Every new building, especially in an urban situation, relates to older ones, as well as to its site and sub-soil. Recent buildings in Winchester designed as offices for the County of Hampshire, have successfully incorporated existing structures, gaining
variety within themselves and acknowledging and 'stitching in with' the sensitive urban fabric of the City. The method of architectural analysis, and the structural solutions adopted in this exercise, may help to illustrate some of the essential problems and opportunities inherent in the work of marrying new and older buildings.

Donald W. Insall

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 2

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