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The Structural Engineer
Verulam
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N/A

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N/A

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Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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These trees We remarked in March that an arboriculturist friend considered that oak trees in this country were regenerating satisfactorily and their conservation was not at risk. That comment was engendered by a correspondent's concern over the felling of six oak trees; since then we have heard that some experts are seriously concerned about the possible invasion of oak wilt which is endemic in America and which can be carried in the American oak sapwood imported into this country for its highly decorative value. The disease apparently spreads with great rapidity and, like Dutch elm disease, there is no treatment for it. The suggested precaution is to ban the importation of American oak wood. Verulam

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 7

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