The Erection of a 140 m - High Steel Stack in Taiwan
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The Erection of a 140 m - High Steel Stack in Taiwan


The Structural Engineer
The Erection of a 140 m - High Steel Stack in Taiwan
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

First published

N/A

Buy Now

The subject of this paper is the field erection of the off gas stack at Chin Shan nuclear power station, Taiwan. This is a braced frame structure composed of tubular members. The leg splices were site welded and all other connections bolted. A.P. Mann

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 10

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