The Anatomy and Exercise of Engineering Judgement
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The Anatomy and Exercise of Engineering Judgement

The Structural Engineer
The Anatomy and Exercise of Engineering Judgement
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

The nature of engineering judgment and the manner in which it is exercised are considered in the context of structural engineering. J.S. Armitage

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PDF
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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 5

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