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The Structural Engineer

The paper illustrates four examples of the work of a design team who have attempted to produce an alternative form of construction for industrial buildings which integrates the architectural, structural and service requirements, allows flexibility, and yet competes on the same economic terms as the portal framed solution. Peter R. Brett

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The Structural Engineer

Dr. D. D. Matthews (Past President): In my view the answer to the question raised in the title of this evening’s paper is a simple affirmative. Dr. Beeby has raised a number of interesting points and treated them in a workmanlike manner. He points out the inconsistencies in the way one-way spans are treated, particularly in comparison with two-way slabs supported along their edges, and, to a lesser extent, flat slabs.

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The Structural Engineer

Mr E. H. Thorpe (M) (South West Water Authority): It has been my privilege to work alongside Mr Walmsley since 1974, during which time limit state design and BS 5337 were introduced and applied to the programme of investigation into the many alternative ways of designing service reservoirs and the considerations to be taken into account. From the paper you will have seen that, in one particular aspect, we have not adhered to BS 5337 and that is in our use of ‘option 2’ for the determination of thermal steel areas for reservoir roof flat slabs. Perhaps Mr Walmsley would like to make further comments on this point.

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The Structural Engineer

The formal corntnent of the Institution on the consultative document Private certification for building control, issued by the Department of the Environment, is set out below. The observations reflect the long-standing policy urged on the Department by the Institution to vary the system of Building Regulation enforcement.

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The Structural Engineer

The first major policy statement of the Engineering Council was made in London recently. The Council’s Chairman, Sir Kenneth Corfield, at a press conference to announce the details of his intentions, stressed that there was an urgent need to attract some of the best intellects into engineering, since it was not in the long-term interests of a company or an individual that first-class engineers better suited to the engineering function should be attracted into management for reasons of pay and status. The Council, he said, would consult with a wide range of organisations in an effort to change fundamental attitudes towards engineers and technicians throughout industry. The full text of the Council’s policy statement is given below: Introduction The performance of engineering in the United Kingdom is paramount to the nation’s future industrial, economic and social prosperity. The revenue earned from the products we make, the services we supply, and the business we generate, relies extensively on the quality of our engineering expertise and the development of our manufacturing capability.

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The Structural Engineer

That cranked beam. . . again Overall stability We hope that the problem presented by M. C. E. Lea in the September 1982 issue provoked some thought and perhaps even confusion. In his letter to us, Mr Lea demonstrated two ways to arrive at a solution. His first approach was an analysis by strain energy which is long and mathematical, so we do not publish it here. We are sure that you will be able to do that for yourselves (if you have not already done so), once his answer is available! His second approach, together with his own comments, we publish in full: Verulam

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