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The Structural Engineer

More than 200 members and their ladies attended the Institution dinner held in London at the end of September to mark the retirement of Cyril Morgan.

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The Structural Engineer

The paper describes the design philosphy and resulting structural solutions for a new bus garage which utiiises an elevated motorway as part of the roof. It describes also the results of loading preliminary test piles which revealed anomalies in the performance of bored in situ piles of different sizes. I.H. McFarlane, R.F.D. Povey and J.A. Rowe

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The Structural Engineer

Mr B. M. Sadgrove (CIRIA): CIRIA is undertaking two projects associated with the topic under discussion today.

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The Structural Engineer

Building Regulations-whether fees for building control, private certification, form and content, extension of the national regulations to Inner London-have been under active consideration by the Institution in discussions with the Department of the Environment, on the one hand, and with the Institution membership, on the other, for nearly 4 years. In the notes that follow Mr James Sutherland (Harris & Sutherland; Chairman of the Institution’s Working Party on Building Regulations; member of the Building Regulations Advisory Committee), Mr Stefan Tietz (S. B. Tietz & Partners; member of the Institution’s Working Party; member of the Joint Committee on Building Legislation), and Mr Raymond Cousins (Cyril Blumfield & Partners; member of the Joint Committee) give their personal views on Building Regulations. These views should stimulate much discussion from the floor-and in writing from those unable to attend on 13 January 1983. R.J.M. Sutherland, S.B. Tietz and R.J.R. Cousins

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The Structural Engineer

I propose to take as the text for my Address the definition of structural engineering, which is, as you all no doubt know, ‘Structural engineering is the science and art of designing and making with economy and elegance buildings, bridges, frameworks and other similar structures so that they can safely resist the forces to which they may be subjected’. C.J. Evans

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The Structural Engineer

Slender Columns It is not often that we get letters from foreign parts, but we have this plea for help from Mr Peter Hoole with the United Nations in Vienna: Having come fairly recently to use CP 110, and being in a somewhat isolated position here in Vienna, there is one aspect of the Code relating to column design that bothers me and on which I can find no advice. Perhaps some expert reader could enlighten me. The question relates to section 3.5.7 Part I: 1972. For various reasons, many of the columns in the structures I am concerned with are only 200mm wide and consequently, while for upper floors the columns are usually SHORT by definition, the ground floor legs are often around the margin between SHORT/SLENDER. This would not previously have caused too much concern. However, the effect on the design moments of a move from a SR of 11.9 to 12.1 with CP 110 is very significant, commonly 100-200% increase for unbraced column moments and requiring a similar percentage increase in the reinforcement. This effect is brought about by consideration of clause 3.5.7.2 which requires that a secondary moment proportional to the square of the larger effective length (commonly the unbraced x-x) divided by the column width be considered. Verulam

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