Contents page

The Structural Engineer

The present system for grading the fire resistance of structural elements gives little scope for engineering design, and the current regulatory requirements give only a broad indication of the fire safety objectives. Methods of quantifying fire exposure and structural behaviour in building fires for design purposes are reviewed, and it is suggested they could form part of a new approach to designing structural safety. Such an approach would be more selective and would take into account the beneficial effects of fire safety measures which are increasingly required for life safety. It is necessary for public authorities to identify clearly the fire safety objectives of the regulations, while structural engineer should propose a formulation of performance requirements which would give design methods compatible with structural Codes and would help to facilitate cost-effective design. Margaret Law

The Structural Engineer

The education of the engineer is directed, almost exclusively, towards the development of analytical, left-hemisphere brain activity. The intuitive mind, critical in the initial, conceptual modelling of a structural solution, is virtually ‘untrained’ in higher education. An emphasis placed on pictorial solutions to structural problems could lead to the development of ‘structural engineering intuition ’. D.M. Brohn

The Structural Engineer

‘A good design has certain typical features simplicity, unity and necessity. Simplicity is common to excellence in all the arts-that impression of ease which is usually the result of intense effort. The structure in which evident difficulties have been painfully overcome lacks excellence. Simple does not mean elementary; a structure suited to its purpose and easily constructed may be of great analytical complexity.' Peter Campbell

The Structural Engineer

The paper questions whether true structural design is taught on most first degree courses in civil and structural engineering. The authors believe that the desirable attributes of a structural designer are ignored by traditional courses, and reasons for this are offered. M.H. Dawes, B.O. Hilson, P.A. Palmer and P.D. Rodd

The Structural Engineer

This paper focuses attention on the fundamental vocational learning needs of a typical practising structural engineer. Different types of experience from which we learn are identified and discussed. After a brief discussion on the nature of learning, specific areas of learning are considered in relation to the several stages of the engineer’s career. Suggestions are made on the allocation of academic course time to specific areas of learning. J.S. Armitage

The Structural Engineer

Today, most young structural engineers are educated on civil engineering degree courses. This paper discusses the aims and objectives of design studies on such courses, Structural design studies should involve much more than just mathematical analysis. The content of the structural design syllabus is questioned-and a change in emphasis is proposed. R. Bishop and F.E. Weare

The Structural Engineer

The main theme of this lecture is the enormous importance of engineering in modern society, the damage that has been done by lack of understanding of the significance and principles of engineering by so many people in positions of influence and power, and the need to rectify this lack of mutual understanding between engineers and others, so as to ensure that engineers make their influence felt more effectively to the great benefit of the nation. Viscount Caldecote

The Structural Engineer

The paper discusses the needs of engineers for postgraduate training. The development of basic skills through the experience obtained on specific project work, and the need to encourage innovative but sound applications of such skills, can be ensured with a carefully considered approach to planned training. James H. Armstrong

The Structural Engineer

Foundations and Building Regulations submissions Whatever the aspect, the subject of Building Regulations submissions is one that elicits strong views and forthright language on the part of our correspondents. Mr J. T. O’Rourke has written, deploring the rigidity sometimes applied in dealing with the structural aspects of submissions. In his opinion, the refusal, by some engineers, to make simple engineering judgments in their appraisals detracts from the reputation of the profession and leads to lack of respect by other professions. He illustrates his point by reference to an example: The problem relates to a Building Regulation submission, and the consequent comments of the local authority engineer. (I should point out, at this stage, that I am employed by a local authority and check Building Regulations submissions myself. I have, therefore, no particular axe to grind in this direction.) Verulam