Contents page

The Structural Engineer

This paper sets out a way in which a structural engineer can decide whether a proposed structure would turn out to be dynamically unstable if built in a particular site. When the simple calculations indicate that the structure would, in fact, be wind sensitive, advice is given on ways of entirely avoiding the situtation at the design stage instead of alluding a real, and therefore expensive, problem to arise during construction, or after completion. Professor A. Bolton

The Structural Engineer

Why design for demolition? In the past, structural engineers have paid scant attention to the problems associated with the eventual demolition of their structures. The likely reasons for this are, perhaps, firstly, that the lifespans of traditional buildings have been so long and uncertain that the problem of demolition has had little immediacy at the design stage. Secondly, the client who commissions the construction of a building is often not the client who commissions its demolition; economic considerations are thus sharply separated. Thirdly, techniques for the demolition of traditional gravity structures are reasonably straightforward, requiring little or no engineering input. P. Waldron and D.I. Blockley

The Structural Engineer

Mr R. G. D. Brown (Banks, Brown Associates): I would like to congratulate the authors on an excellent and well-presented paper and would like to make one or two comments.

The Structural Engineer

The paper describes the structural design and construction of a two-storey office block incorporating reinforced orpost-tensioned brickwork beams, stairs, walls, and piers. R.E. Bradshaw, J.P. Drinkwater and S.E. Bell

The Structural Engineer

1. Introduction 1.1 The proposal to establish an Engineering Assembly was included in the Engineering Council’s Policy Statement of September 1982 and is described in general terms in draft Bye Law 77, appended. (See post.) The present consultative document makes detailed proposals for the Assembly based on discussions in the Standing Committee for Professional Institutions and the Council itself. It takes account of submissions made by a Working Party of CEI elected members and the CEI’s Regional Affairs Committee. As a result of points made at the April meeting of the Council, it also includes proposals for a linked regional structure.

The Structural Engineer

Checking the unqualified In March, we quoted from a letter received from Mr D. S. Poppitt commenting on his experiences in checking calculations on behalf of local authorities and, in particular, those prepared by unqualified people. Three of our readers have responded to his comments and given us some details of the problems or difficulties that have arisen within their knowledge in the approval of building designs. Verulam