Added to basket

Contents page

The Structural Engineer

The paper discusses the design of cable-stayed roofs, with particular reference to a number of buildings recently constructed. J.A. Thornton

Publish Date - N/A

The Structural Engineer

Stanley Ferry Aqueduct is a three-span prestressed concrete structure at Stanley Ferry, near Wakefield, West Yorkshire. The aqueduct carries a canal waterway across the River Calder and lies alongside the original Stanley Ferry Aqueduct which opened in 1839 and remains as a listed structure. J.L. Simpson

Publish Date - N/A

The Structural Engineer

Alastair Paterson, FEng, Senior Partner, Bullen & Partners, consulting engineers, will succeed Dr. Roy Rowe, CBE, FEng, as President of the Institution 1984-85. The handover comes on Thursday 4 October 1984 when, at an Ordinary Meeting at Institution headquarters, beginning at 6 pm, Mr Paterson will give his Presidential Address ‘The structural engineer in context’. The full text will be published in The Structural Engineer in December next.

Publish Date - N/A

The Structural Engineer

Cold-formed purlins The lateral restraint of cold-formed steel purlins provided by cladding has attracted the attention of a number of readers during the past few months. In May, Dr. S. J. Bates mentioned the use of additional bracings as part of the purlin system in Australia and elsewhere. This has brought us some comments from Mr John W. Woodside, writing from Adelaide: As the building material, corrugated galvanised iron or its equivalent in various sheeting profiles, is one of the major sheeting elements used in this country, the use of cold-formed section as purlins and girts to support this cladding is very common in Australia. Design of purlins in Australia is normally based on using manufacturer’s tables, which in turn is based on the cold-formed steel structures Code AS 1538 or experimental testing. The design of purlins for load inwards is normally based on the sheeting attached to the purlin but, in addition, bridging or sag struts are normally provided to these purlins, particularly for large spans. In the case of loads outwards, it is usually taken that the roof sheeting does not provide lateral restraint to the flanges and that the bridging is the only form of lateral restraint. Verulam

Publish Date - N/A