BS 5628: Structural Use of Masonry
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BS 5628: Structural Use of Masonry

The Structural Engineer
BS 5628: Structural Use of Masonry
Date published

N/A

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Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

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Most structural engineers will have been familiar with CP111 Structural recommendations for loadbearing walls, first published in 1948, revised in 1964, and metricated in 1970. The Code was amended from time to time but was lacking in guidance in several important areas, e.g. the lateral strength of walls and accidental loading. It contained a very short section on reinforced brickwork walls which was not sufficient to enable the material to be used in an economical way. The workmanship, nonstructural design, and some materials aspects of masonry, were dealt with in CP121 Code of practice for walling: Part l: Brick and block masonry, published in 1951 and revised in 1973.

B.A. Haseltine

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 10

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