Concrete Opportunities for the Structural Engineer (a Review of Modified Concretes for Use in Struct
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Concrete Opportunities for the Structural Engineer (a Review of Modified Concretes for Use in Struct

The Structural Engineer
Concrete Opportunities for the Structural Engineer (a Review of Modified Concretes for Use in Struct
Date published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

During recent years, there have been numerous innovations in concrete technology which have resulted in the availability of materials with properties that are very different from those of conventional structural concretes. These materials include fibre-rein forced and polymer-modified concretes, high-strength concrete, macrodefect-free cements, self-levelling and high workability concretes, and many others. In addition, there has been greater interest in the use of waste materials such as ground granulated blas[furnace slag, pulverised .fuel ash or silica fume. Some of these materials have found no immediate application. J.L. Clarke and C.D. Pomeroy

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 2

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