Restoration of Albert Dock
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Restoration of Albert Dock

The Structural Engineer
Restoration of Albert Dock
Date published

N/A

First published

N/A

Price

Standard: £9 + VAT
Members/Subscribers: Free

Buy Now

This paper describes the structural works which have been carried out during the phase I refurbishment of the Albert Dock Buildings (Blocks A, B, E) and the Dock Traffic Office in Liverpool. Mention is also made of the proposals and initial design work connected with the refurbishment of the southern end of Block C with which the authors’ practice is currently involved. The paper describes the refurbishment of the structure to the Albert Dock warehouses and the Dock Traffic Office in separate sections. Treatments to the foundations and roofs are described, together with a description of the method used to repair the brickwork. The structural works involved with fitting out the buildings to the architect’s and developer’s requirements are also covered. This paper is intended to be read in conjunction with the asocinled paper by Parkinson & Curtin Albert Dock-structural survey, appraisal, and rehabilitation’ which describes the initial survey work and building structure of the Albert Dock buildings. J.A. Tallis, R.D. Taylor and T.J. Dishman

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The Institution of Structural Engineers

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Issue 10

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