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The Structural Engineer

The author left school in 1954 and was a mechanical engineering apprentice for 1 year. In 1955 he began a structural/civil apprenticeship which was completed in 1959. His technical education followed ‘the hard way’, via ONC, HNC, and Supplementary Subject passes up to 1963. He was chartered into the Instituion of Structural Engineers in 1965 and into the Institution of Civil Engineers in 1967. From 1960 onwards he held postions of increasing responsibility in consulting, contracting, and management, and founded his own practice in 1969. Since then, with his partners, he has established offices in various parts of the UK and began to practise in multidisciplinary engineering in 1982. At present the practice is being extened to the Far East and has fluctuated in size in recent years between about 80 and 120 staff. C. Dinardo

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The Structural Engineer

This very brief overview is best read with the accompanying diagram of the French education system. At age 17 or 18, French students who intend to go on to higher education in the major disciplines (including, therefore, civil engineering and architecture) take the ‘Baccalauréat’ examination, which marks the end of secondary education and gives access to universities and similar establishments. H. Judéaux

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The Structural Engineer

The education and registration of structural engineers in the United States is, of course, varied due to the large number of institutions involved. However, certain generalities can be made. The system allows for a great deal of flexibility and change by students. The comments contained herein are the impressions and experiences of the author, a practising engineer who teaches part time, not a professional educator. R. Silman

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The Structural Engineer

All Presidents are made very aware of the views of the membership, and one of the major issues surfacing in this Institution is a concern with the routes to membership. Professor E. Happold

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The Structural Engineer

In Denmark attendance at school starts at the age of 6, and attendance at primary school and lower secondary school (main school) is compulsory until the age of 15. Those wishing to go on to study engineering will then attend a higher secondary school (gymnasium) for 3 years, giving a total of 12 years' school education. Some 70 OOO children go through the system each year. Whichever engineering school is chosen, those applying for admission must have passed one of the following: -the upper secondary school leaving examination (studenterksamen) in the 'physics-mathematics option' (which also includes languages and humanities) -the higher preparatory examination (Hojere Forberedelseseksamen - HF) including maths and physics or (teknikum) -the special entrance examination of an engineering college Professor O. Vangguard

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The Structural Engineer

The current situation as regards professional engineers’ responsibility, professional liability, and the options available for PI insurance, were discussed at a recent meeting of the Institution’s Council, also attended by some invited guests. Some new factors, such as the impact of the Latent Damage Act 1986, were also considered. S. Tietz

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The Structural Engineer

This paper is a general overview of the status of civil or architectural engineers in Japan with regard to institutional plans concerning their registration, examination for, professional titles, rights and responsibilities, and education and training. K. Umeda

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The Structural Engineer

How to become a structural engineer The education and training of structural engineers follows the general lines of the Swiss education system. With the exception of the Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology in Zürich and Lausanne, all public and professional schools and universities are run by the cantons. Professor K. Dietrich

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The Structural Engineer

After toddler classes, which start at the age of 4 years (Group l and 2), junior school starts in the Netherlands at the age of 6 years. Six years are spent in Group 3. Secondary school follows; this ends at different levels: -lower secondary education (4 years) or -higher secondary education (5 years) or -preuniversity education (6 years) Professor L.P. Sikkel

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The Structural Engineer

The plan of study in Kadsruhe Who is studying civil engineering? To enter university pupils have to attend primary school for 4 years and high school for 9; they therefore come to university at the age of about 19. Most (ca. 70 %) of the students come this way-the rest are studying at special high schools, technical schools and so on. Our university today has about 1100 students of civil engineering, mostly boys. The overall number of students in this subject has dropped in recent years: 5 years ago there were about 180 new students in Karlsruhe each year; now there are ca. 145. Professor Dr. Ing. F. Wenzel

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The Structural Engineer

The Euroengineer - does he exist? I believe there have been a very few sightings of this rara avis but, as with the Loch Ness Monster and the Abominable Snowman, one is not quite sure of the facts. Mostly the sightings have been in continental Europe rather than in the British Isles, for reasons I will explain. Indeed, the Euroengineer should be neither a ‘monster’ nor ‘abominable’. If he does not yet exist, it is essential that we create him and cause him to breed, for our need is great. Although not a god he may be the salvation of Europe and Voltaire’s words seem very appropriate ‘Si Dieu n’existait pas, it faudrait l’inventer’. Professor P.B. Morice

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The Structural Engineer

Over the last few years, there has been an increasing public awareness of the initiatives and influence of the European Commission (EC) in Brussels. This perception has been extending beyond household matters, such as the notorious agricultural price/surplus manipulations, into some areas which may be relevant to this conference. Three of the most important are: education and training standards mutual recognition of qualifications regular visitor to Bmsels. on the Eurocode Steering technical standards and Codes of Practice. D.W. Lazenby

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The Structural Engineer

In any organisation, the larger the group of senior engineers involved in determining the training programme of young engineers, the more objective will be the opinion as to what is required of that training. Different firms have different markets and therefore different priorities. B.P. Clancy

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The Structural Engineer

Recognition in the USA In February, we published a letter from Mr C. J. Hawksworth, from Winchester, USA. We now have a caveat from Mr C. Shearer, living in the Pacific Northwest, to the effect that he believes Mr Hawksworth’s letter to be ‘very misleading ’. He writes: The impression one has from his letter is that all one needs to do to become registered in the USA is to have a note from the Institution, along with details of one’s college training. Mr Hawksworth does not appear to realise that each State in the USA has its own rules and regulations regarding professional registration. While I do not claim to know the rules and regulations for each State, I have heard that some States are very ‘easy-going’ and relaxed regarding registration. Mr Hawksworth appears to have the good fortune of residing in such a State. Verulam

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